One Dead in a Recent E. coli Outbreak

One Dead in a Recent E. coli Outbreak
A report by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Wednesday the 2nd of May, 2018, stated that three new States, Kentucky, Massachusetts, and Utah, have reported cases of illness linked to E. coli. This strain of bacteria, the Shiga Toxin-producing E. coli, is generally considered more toxic. Therefore, a higher than expected number of casualties have been hospitalized since the first case got reported. Already, 102 cases are confirmed. Off this 51 % require hospitalization as compared to the 31% case that usually gets registered in other strains.
Fourteen people are already diagnosed with the hemolytic uremic syndrome, a kind of kidney failure that affects about 10% of all E. coli infected people. Twenty-three additional cases of the infection including one death in California were announced on Wednesday bringing the number of sick people to a hundred and twenty-one. The state of California’s Health Department, however, refused to share more details on the patient who died. A total number of twenty-five states have been affected so far.
In a recent article by the Verge, https/www.theverge.com/2018/5/2/17312192/romaine-lettuce-e-coli-outbrak-yuma-arizona-cdc, the CDC urged the American population to refrain from eating lettuce whose origin is not precise. The advice is inclusive of whole heads of romaine, chopped romaine, baby romaine, salad and salad mixes containing romaine lettuce, bearing in mind that packaging does not always include growing regions.
The investigative task force of the CDC has identified at least one farm, Harrison Farms of Yuma, Arizona, to be a probable germ source but insists many cases are as a result of romaine grown in other farms. The symptoms of the infection by the Shiga toxin-producing E. coli set in three to four days after the consumption of contaminated food products. The indications include diarrhea, abdominal cramps, and vomiting. On rare instances, symptoms would include fatigue, fever, and unusual bleeding. Most people recover, but some cases prove severe and can be fatal.

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