Google’s Chrome 67 allows for “password-free sign-ins” for many websites

A stable Google Chrome 67 update has been made available for Windows, MAC, and Linux operating systems. With the recent Google Chrome browser update, the web browser is now making it easier for users to return to their favorite websites and log-in without entering their information each time. Chrome 67 is the latest version of the browser just released by Google and thanks to a new standard for web technologies it can give users ease of access.

 

A report from The Verge indicates that “password-free” sign-ins (and sign-ups) have been enabled for the new Chrome browser on “most websites.” The Verge says that Mozilla Firefox was the first to adopt the Web Authentication standard which was first launched this past March. Thanks to that standard, Google was able to integrate the password-free feature onto the newest Chrome 67 version for desktop users.

 

There are some other interesting aspects being integrated into the Chrome 67 browser. One of those aspects will help to increase site isolation. This means that users operating the browser with multiple tabs open at once won’t have to worry that one site accesses data from another on their open tabs.

 

In addition, it’s been suggested that Google is looking to have other gadgets associated with the desktop browser. For example, it’s reported by Verge that Chrome will have better compatibility with virtual reality using the Generic Sensor API. This standard has been used in many VR headsets and fitness trackers that are available today.

 

As ZDNet reported, the concept behind Chrome 67 and other browsers using “password-free” methods for website sign-ins, or sign-ups, is to allow users a way to access websites using fingerprints, facial images, or USB keys to authenticate their login.

 

In addition to the previously mentioned browser updates and features, Google also has fixed a total of 34 security bugs present in the previous version of the browser. Nine of those were classified as “high-severity flaws,” with 12 considered “medium-severity.” The flaws were initially reported by external researchers to help Google make the browser more secure.

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