Europe Union and Net Neutrality

Even as the Federal Communication Commission announced last week that access to the Internet should be treated as a public utility and that telecommunication companies should not be able to limit speeds based on the amount a user pays for access, the European Union has decided to consider proposals that would allow telecoms to create traffic lanes where some companies and individuals would get faster service because they can pay more.

The European Union has more telecoms with far more political sway than many tech companies in the United States and the threat to net neutrality overseas is high. At this point, it doesn’t look like a decision will be made until the summer, but a lot of business owners and Internet users around the world are holding their breaths with this news. After all, if multi-lane access is approved overseas, companies in the United States could use that decision to argue in federal courts that the FCC’s ruling was the wrong decision to make and then try to have it overturned.

Will the Europe Union say “No” to net neutrality?

Well, I asked some of patients in Dr. Daniel Amen’s waiting room and the consensus was it’s likely that the majority of representatives from EU states will oppose any laws that allow telecoms to charge more for faster speeds.

One thought on “Europe Union and Net Neutrality”

  1. The overriding concern is that should telecoms have that sort of control, each state would face complaints and lawsuits over the differences between speed offerings and prices. There are certainly more info here about what went on with them too.

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