Samsung Battery Could Give Complete Charge in Mere Minutes

Samsung’s newly developed battery technology should charge smartphones, tablets, and electric cars in minutes flat, claims Samsung’s Advanced Institute of Technology.

The company affirms that the recent tech needs only 12 minutes to fully charge a device that now requires an hour to fill up, even with the use of fast-charge.

Samsung says that the technology utilizes graphene, a thin layer of carbon atoms procured out of graphite, which conducts electricity 100 times more productively than copper. The material transports energy 140 times quicker than the up-to-date silicon-based, lithium batteries, giving hope for a faster recharge than ever before.

Potentially, the new tech could increase battery’s energy-holding volume and provide its devices or cars with longer battery life. At this early stage, just how long these batteries could last is a mystery; however, the high-speed charging would mean uncommonly quick fill-ups, making the battery exponentially more user-friendly in the small span of daily time it would take. Spending the few daily minutes it might take to check in with a charger could lead to never running out of battery at all.

Current fast-charging tech in devices provides a 50% charge in thirty minutes, which is significantly quicker than a “regular” charge, giving a full charge in about two hours. The brand-new technology, however, would completely change the game.

Not only this, Samsung is assuring the public that they can widely manufacture the innovation and at a reasonable cost. As promising as the tech is, though, the company hasn’t yet made clear dates for the tech’s use in smartphones or other electronics.

At the moment, we can only suppose how fast this tech could charge Tesla vehicles and other larger electric gear.

The Upside of Only Five Tech Firms Controlling the U.S

The U.S is home to Apple, Amazon, Google, Facebook, and Microsoft. The five tech giants presently control over 90 percent of smartphone technology, e-commerce, social media, etc. In his recent article posted on the New York Times’ website, Farhad Manjoo analyzes the five tech companies noting both the good and bad associated with the “frightful five” as Manjoo refers to them.

Manjoo’s article comes in the wake of the revelation by Facebook that a Russian company bought ads on the social networking platform to influence last year’s presidential poll. In fact, Facebook, Google, alongside the influential but not so big Twitter appeared before the Congress this week to testify about how their game-changing technology could have influenced the presidential poll. Manjoo’s endless arguments that the frightful five’s size and influence pose a danger were confirmed this week. He suggests that the tech giants have demonstrated beyond any reasonable doubt that they are out to reshape the world and the impact of their actions could be positive or negative. Before discussing the downside of only five tech giants controlling the U.S and parts of the world, Manjoo delves into the positives of the five being in charge.

Manjoo suggests that although the actions of the frightful five could influence the society in a not so positive way, the government can quickly reign on them. He illustrates this point with the recent appearance of Facebook, Google, and Twitter’s executives before the Congress. Would the same be possible if the internet was under the control of uncountable small firms?

The members of the frightful five are uncomfortable with each other, and Manjoo explains that this is a good thing especially for the users of tech. The five are continuously in a cold war meant to outdo the other either by investing heavily in research to widen the span of their control or developing new tech. The result are innovations which are beneficial to consumers

Strikingly, the five are American brands meaning that they are subject to the American laws and values.